Self Management / Self Monitoring: Default Server Status Monitor

Open Manage Network Manager also includes a Default Server Status Monitor that monitors its own serverYou can edit this monitor to alter polling intervals, and make different calculations for the monitored attributes. Those attributes include TotalMemory, FreeMemory, MemoryInUse, ThreadCount and TrapCount for Application Server and Mediation Server processes. You cannot modify the targets for this monitor.You must create your own Dashboard to view the data in this monitor. create a custom dashboard

Create a Server Status Monitor Dashboard

1. Create a custom dashboard.

2. Click the edit icon on one of the dashboard components and set the data source as the Default Server Status Monitor, and the target as the server monitored.

3. Save the monitor

See Dashboard Views and How to: Create a Simple Dashboard View for more about configuring dashboards.

Create an SNMP Interface Monitor

To set up a typical performance monitor, follow these steps:

1. In the Resource Monitors portlet, and create a new monitor by right-clicking and selecting New.

2. Select the type of monitor from the submenu--for this example, an SNMP Interfaces monitor. Consult the User Guide for more specific instructions about other types of monitors.

Some devices have ports rather than interfaces. This monitor works for them too, even though it is an “interface” monitor.

3. In the General screen, enter a polling interval (5 minutes is the default). For this example, check Retain polled data and accept the remaining defaults for checkboxes and the retention policy.

4. Select an entity to monitor by clicking the Add button in the top portion of the Monitor Options screen. For an interface monitor, select Interface as the Type at the top of the screen. You can also filter the list of interfaces that appear further by selecting Interface Type as ge (gigabit ethernet), for example.

Notice that you can add refinements like filtering on Administrative State and IP Address to the filter.

5. Select interfaces (Ctrl+click to add more than one), then click Add Selection then Done to confirm your entity. Hover your cursor over a line describing an interface to have a more complete description appear as a popup.

6. Click Browse to display the MIB Browser. For the sake of this example, we elect to monitor ifInErrors (in RFC Standard MIBs, RFC1213-MIB > Nodes > mib-2 > interfaces > ifTable > ifEntry > ifInErrors).

7. In the Thresholds screen, configure thresholds by first clicking Add.

8. Click Add above the threshold levels list for each threshold you want to add.

9. In the threshold editor, enter a name (Examples: Low, Medium, Overload), an upper and lower boundary, (0 - 10, 10 - 100, 100+), a severity (Informational, Warning, Critical) and color (BLUE, YELLOW, RED). In this case, no string matching is necessary. When the data crosses thresholds, the monitor reacts.

Attributes available depend on the type of monitor you are creating. Notice that you can also check to make crossing this threshold emit a notification (an alarm that would appear on the Alarm panel). You can also configure the type of calculation, and so on. You can even alter existing thresholds by selecting one then clicking Edit to the right of the selected threshold.

10. Click Apply for each threshold interval you configure, then Apply for the entire threshold configuration.

If a threshold’s counter is an SNMP Counter32 (a 32-bit counter) monitoring can exceed its capacity with a fully utilized gigabit interface in a relatively short period of time. The defaults configured in this monitor account for this, but if you know that this is an issue, you can probably configure the monitor to account for it too.

After taking a look at Thresholds no more configuration is required. Notice, however, that you can also configure Calculated Metrics, Inventory Mappings and Conditions on other screens in this editor to calculate additional values based on the monitored attributes, to map them, and to make conditional properties based on monitored behavior.

Calculated Metrics is particularly valuable if you want to monitor a composite like ifInErrors + ifOutErrors or want to calculate a parameter like errors per minute when the monitor’s interval is 5 minutes.

11. Click Save and the monitor is now active.

Notice that the Availability icon appears at the top of a Monitor Status Summary snap panel in the Expanded Resource Monitor next to a time/date stamp of its last polling. Right-click the monitor and select Refresh Monitor to manually initiate polling.

Values displayed in the Overall Availability column of the Monitor Manager do not automatically refresh and may be out of date. The Reference Tree snap panel maps the monitor’s relationship to its target(s) attribute(s) and other elements. The Details snap panel summarizes the monitor’s configuration.

12. For information about having the monitor’s results appear in the a Dashboard portlet, see Dashboard Views.

Create an ICMP Monitor

The following steps create an ICMP (ping) monitor.

1. In the Resource Monitors portlet, and create a new monitor by right-clicking and selecting New.

2. Select the type of monitor from the submenu--for this example, an ICMP monitor. Consult the User Guide for more specific instructions about other types of monitors.

3. In the General screen, enter a name (Test ICMP Monitor), and a polling interval (5 minutes is the default). For this example, check Retain polled data and accept the remaining defaults for checkboxes and the retention policy.

4. Select an entity to monitor by clicking the Add button in the top portion of the Monitor Options screen.

5. Select devices you want to ping, (Ctrl+click to add more than one), then click Add Selection then Done to confirm your entity.

6. Define packets in the ICMP Monitor Options panel, including Packet Size, Packet Count and timeout. You can accept the defaults here, too.

7. In the Thresholds tab, select an attribute (MaxRTT, or maximum round trip time) and add the following thresholds by clicking Add:

Name High color red, Lower Boundary 15 and Upper Boundary [blank] Severity Critical

Name Fine color green, Lower Boundary 0 and Upper Boundary 15 Severity Cleared.

Notice that this example does not emit a notification. If you checked that checkbox, an alarm of the configured severity would accompany crossing the threshold.

8. Accept the other defaults and click Apply

9. Click Save.

10. Test ICMP Monitor now appears in the portlet.

Create a Key Metrics Monitor

Follow these steps to create a Key Metrics Monitor (also, see Key Metric Editor).

1. In the Resource Monitors portlet, and create a new monitor by right-clicking and selecting New.

2. Select the type of monitor from the submenu--for this example, an Key Metrics monitor. Consult the User Guide for more specific instructions about other types of monitors.

3. In the General screen, enter a name (Test Key Metrics Monitor), and a polling interval (5 minutes is the default). For this example, check Retain polled data and accept the remaining defaults for checkboxes and the retention policy.

4. Select an entity to monitor by clicking the Add button in the top portion of the Monitor Options screen.

5. Select devices on which you want to monitor Key Metrics.

6. Select from the available metrics that appear at the bottom of the screen in Key Metric Properties by selecting a category with the pick list at the top of the screen, then click on an Available metric, and click the right arrow to make it a Selected metric.

7. Click Save to retain your new Monitor.

8. Test Key Metrics Monitor appears in the Resource Monitors portlet.

Create an Adaptive CLI Monitor

You can create monitors that track Adaptive CLI responses. The following outlines the steps:

1. Determine the Show Command that you want to run

2. Create ACLI to extract the data

3. Create the Monitor that uses the data from the ACLI

4. Create any threshold crossing events/actions (see Thresholds)

5. Create dashboards (see Dashboard Views) to view results to preserve them.